List of development tools for Linux platform – IDEs & Compilers

One of my most recent endeavors was to set up my old linux machine for development. I chose the Debian Squeeze(6.1.5) distro because of its reputation for stability and also its minimalist approach towards installing packages, and both these features were quite welcome. Having said that, the tools listed here can be downloaded and installed on any distro, in case they are not already included in the installation CD/DVD. Based on my development experience with these tools, this list is frequently updated with new information:

1. GCC (GNU Compiler Collection): The GCC tool chain is considered a sin-qua-non of any linux developer’s toolbox. In fact, the linux kernel itself relies on several libraries provided as part of GCC. The debian squeeze 6.1.5 includes GCC 4.4 which is pretty stable. I’ve compiled several programs in C/C++ without any issues. You can choose to install specific packages such as gcc4.4 for C, or g++4.4 for the C++ language.

Only issue is that you should not install the OpenJDK package (gcj) of the GNU collection. The reason being that it will clash with the Sun/Oracle Java version which is very much preferred if you are into Android development or use other Java features such as Swing or AWT.

GCC is one of your core tools. Whether you use Eclipse or Netbeans to code your C/C++ programs, whether you use the QTcreator or Glade for designing interfaces, GCC is one good tool-chain that most IDEs rely on to build your application.

2. Java/Netbeans: You can download all the java editions for linux including Java ME/EE, documentation & samples and also the Netbeans package from here. I specifically chose the combined Netbeans+JDK7.5 to avoid getting Netbeans separately.

3. MonoDevelop: One of the most important tools that allows me to leverage my Microsoft VB.NET/C# skills on linux is the MonoDevelop IDE. Except for Microsoft proprietary classes such as System.Windows.Forms, all your .NET code is 100% portable to linux through the Mono platform. The only support that MonoDevelop lacks as of now is the ability to design ASP.NET web pages. I believe this limitation is going to be overcome pretty soon.

4. Eclipse: Eclipse was essential for me as I wanted to develop Android apps too which is easier using the Eclipse IDE. The debian squeeze CD comes with version 3.5.2 of eclipse package, whereas I wanted to try the latest Juno version, so I got it from the eclipse site. However, the eclipse SDK for linux is a tar package and not an installer package. This means you have to extract this tar separately in a folder and use eclipse from there. If you do so, ensure that the ..JDK/bin is set in your $PATH variable, so that you can invoke java from the command line. If not, then add it by editing the .profile file in your home directory (/home/xyz, etc..).

5. Android Suite: The android developer site contains complete information about how to download and install the android sdk, along with the system images for the particular android platforms for which you wish to develop. Just keep in mind that android needs the Sun/Oracle java sdk and not the OpenJDK provided by GNU to write android programs.

6. Glade: Glade is an excellent RAD tool to rapidly develop professional-looking user interfaces for your applications. Glade is based on the Gtk+ toolkit that forms the core of the GNOME desktop. Glade basically generates an xml file (similar to the XAML generated in visual-studio) that can be used in many languages such as  C, C++ and Java. However, since the Gtk+ framework is built in C, it is advisable to build your GNOME applications in C for performance benefits. Glade can also be integrated with Anjuta, a full fledged IDE to develop GNOME applications that includes full tool chain integration and debugging support.

7. QTcreator: Based on the extensive QT framework, QTcreator is to KDE desktop what Glade is to GNOME. However, don’t feel crippled because of this as everything is “mix-and-match-able” in the linux world. QT apps can run on GNOME, as do Gtk+ apps run on KDE desktop. Since QT framework is written in C++, the language is well suited to write QT apps. Qtcreator can also be integrated with KDevelop, the equivalent of Anjuta IDE on KDE.

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